Whiteness is deafening - look for the rainbow - look for the many 

- It is who we are. 

 

It was a wondrous sight 

The trees alive; the earth was beating 

The Loom was bleeding sound 

Cacophony of myriad voices 

 

Decorus pluvia - beautiful rainbow! 

Decorus pluvia - under the sea 

Decorus pluvia - so many colors 

Decorus pluvia - within the flowers 

 

Those who stand within 

Are deafened by the constant humming 

Those who stand without 

Begin to hear the many colors 

 

Decorus pluvia - beautiful rainbow! 

Decorus pluvia - under the sea 

Decorus pluvia - so many colors 

Decorus pluvia - within the flowers 

 

Oh Weaver stay thy hand! 

I cannot hear the voice within me 

Oh Weaver stay thy heart 

I cannot see; the whiteness blinds me

 

Whiteness is deafening - look for the rainbow - look for the many 

It is who we are. 

 

Music and Lyrics © 2010 by Tony Garone with excerpts from "Moby Dick" 

Produced by Anthony Garone and William Brown

recorded at Cow Pilot Studios (AZ)

 

Tony Garone - vocals, keyboards, piano and drum loops 

Anthony Garone Jr. - electric guitars, keyboards and drums

 

What is this song about? 

 

I wasn't sure where this song belonged in the grand scheme of things because it combines Pip's experience under the sea and the whale skeleton in the Arsacides. I know that sounds insane to those of you who are deeply entrenched with Melville's book of genius we call Moby Dick. It just seemed to work that way for me. I've mixed and matched the two instances that professor Dreyfus references and they are the loom under the ocean and the flowers that created the tapestry under the whale's skeleton. Whew! That's why you'll find references to the sound of color or vice versa. I think it works. I hope you think so too! 

 

Sooooo - what's going on in this song you might ask? Well, the myriad colors of the rainbow (representing the many perspectives of the universe) and the cacophony of sound from the loom (representing the same thing - according the professor Dreyfus - and I'm with him on this) are celebrated in this song. I just became overwhelmed with this concept for weeks after listening to Drefus's podcast. 

 

What a beautiful thing Melville has done here, and here's my personal spin on this; in order for us to begin to understand the universe, we must step back from our lives to hear the individual voices of the world - only then can we truly begin to understand. It's a wonderful play on the "can't see the forest for the trees" statement. That's my personal epiphany. 

 

Oh yeah - "decorus pluvia" is Latin for "Beautiful Rainbow." I tried various permutations in Latin for this song, but this fit within the lyrical content very nicely. For those of you interested, here are some of the other variations I was looking into: 

 

decorus abbas (beautiful Father) 

plures vox vocis (the many voices)

colo colui cultum of sanus (colors of sound) 

loom of sanus (loom of sound) 

pluvia of sanus (rainbow of sound) 

The Weaver in the Arsacides